Image from OpenLibrary

Black Boy :A Record of Childhood and Youth

By: Wright, Richard
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Perennial Library 1966ISBN: 0060830565; 9780060830564Subject(s): African American Authors - Biography | African Americans - Mississippi - Social Life and Customs | American Authors - 20th Century - Biography | American Authros - Homes and Haunts - Mississippi | Autobiographies | Mississippi - Biography | Mississippi - Social Conditions | Richard Wright (1908-1960) - Childhood and Youth | Richard Wright (1908-1960) - Homes and Haunts - MississippiSummary: Richard Wright grew up in the woods of Mississippi, with poverty, hunger, fear, and hatred. He lied, stole, and raged at those around him; at six he was a "drunkard," hanging about taverns. Surly, brutal, cold, suspicious, and self-pitying, he was surrounded on one side by whites who were either indifferent to him, pitying, or cruel, and on the other by blacks who resented anyone trying to rise above the common lot. Black Boy is Richard Wright's powerful account of his journey from innocence to experience in the Jim Crow South. It is at once an unashamed confession and a profound indictment—a poignant and disturbing record of social injustice and human suffering.
List(s) this item appears in: Juneteenth
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Spark Central
Spark Central is open to the public Tue - Sat, 12 pm - 7 pm
Nonfiction
NF - BIOGRAPHY (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 31214000005520

Richard Wright grew up in the woods of Mississippi, with poverty, hunger, fear, and hatred. He lied, stole, and raged at those around him; at six he was a "drunkard," hanging about taverns. Surly, brutal, cold, suspicious, and self-pitying, he was surrounded on one side by whites who were either indifferent to him, pitying, or cruel, and on the other by blacks who resented anyone trying to rise above the common lot. Black Boy is Richard Wright's powerful account of his journey from innocence to experience in the Jim Crow South. It is at once an unashamed confession and a profound indictment—a poignant and disturbing record of social injustice and human suffering.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.
Spark Central | 1214 W Summit Parkway | Spokane, WA 99210 | 509‑279‑0299 | info@spark‑central.org

Powered by Koha